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This is my diary....what I make sense of, around me. You'll find short prose on contemporary topics that interest me. What can you expect - Best adjectives? …. hmm occasionally, tossed around flowery verbs ?…. Nope, haiku-like super-brevity? … I try to. Thanks for dropping by & hope to see you again

March 27, 2010

One ‘Hella’ number

Earth churns about 43 thousand Giga bytes of data per day - so claimed a recent advertisement by IBM in newspapers. In another Symantec CEO Enrique Salem says that data organized around the world is growing at 60% a year and unstructured data is growing exponentially. 

I tried to figure out how much this works out to and after a bit of number crunching I got a number measuring 1.5 into 10 raised to power 4384 bytes of data churned in a year. I said to myself ‘one helluva of a number‘ and started to see if there were any scales to measure such dinosauric proportions.

Trudging through the standard International scale of Units i came across some fancy sounding names that currently stops at Yottabyte (10to the power 24), prior to this you have Zettabit (10*21), Exabit (10*18) and Peta (10to the power 15) and so in that order. But soon there could be one more number to this lexicon- Hellabit (10*27).

‘Hella’ - a Y generation word that probably has connotations to the American slang has been taken up as a petition with the International system of units (SI) to describe 10 to the 27 zero number. Hella is supposed to take care of measuring inter-galactic distances, wattage of sun or may be some day the online storage capacity of facebook servers.

However all these fancy name calling reminded me of one venerable Ms.Centillion (1 followed by 303 zeroes). This gal stuck in the minds of a few star struck FBNO*s who not long ago had named a wannabe financial services BPO this far fetched name. But soon all its zeros went scurrying for cover leaving the poor 1 behind. And true to its numbers it had become a ‘one’ year wonder.

*fly-by-night operators
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